Science GIFs

Logo

'Science GIFs' was one of the largest and most active science-oriented collections on the Google+ social network with over 325,000 followers at the time of its shutting down. This website serves as a backup of the content from the collection.

https://plus.google.com/collection/A2NSc

View a Random Post

Programmable Water Droplets

16 June 2018

The ability of a liquid to maintain contact with a solid surface is a property called wetting. It is determined by the balance between adhesive and cohesive forces resulting from intermolecular interactions. Adhesive forces cause the liquid to spread across a surface while cohesive forces cause the liquid to ball up and avoid contact. Water-repellant fabrics are an example of non-wetting materials because they minimize interactions between the surface and water droplets.

Electrowetting is a technique to modify the wetting properties of a surface using an external electric field. Dielectric arrays can be used to create microfluidic devices that allow for programatic control of droplet motion. Scientists have used these techniques to perform biological automation and are now exploring the possibility of water-based computer interfaces.

Source: http://tangible.media.mit.edu/project/programmable-droplets-for-interaction/

Learn More: https://doi.org/10.1145/3170427.3186607 ( CHI 2018 )

#ScienceGIF #Science #GIF #Water #Droplet #Programmable #Electrowetting #Dielectric #Engineering #Material #Physics #MIT #Tangible #Media #CHI View Original Post on Google+

Programmable Water Droplets

Induction Heating

9 June 2018

An alternating current passing through a copper coil induces a magnetic field around the coil per Faraday ‘s Law of Induction. A piece of metal placed within that oscillating magnetic field will experience the opposite effect as an electric current is induced within the metal. These eddy currents passing through the metal induce an opposing magnetic field around the piece of metal and cause it to heat up through a process known as Joule heating. The stronger the change in magnetic field, the more heat generation.

When a piece of aluminum is placed within a magnetic field generated using a 1.6 kW power inverter operating at 204 kHz, it rapidly heats and eventually melts at 660 °C. The molten aluminum reaches a final temperature of 1,200 °C before the current is finally shut off.

Source: https://youtu.be/DkpEz7znpnc

#ScienceGIF #Science #GIF #Induction #Heating #Magnetism #Electromagnetism #Current #Eddy #Metal #Aluminum #Melting #Joule #Faraday View Original Post on Google+

Induction Heating

First Imagery from GOES-17

2 June 2018

On March 1, 2018, NASA and NOAA successfully launched GOES-17 , the second in a new series of four highly advanced geostationary weather satellites. Once positioned in its final orbit, the satellite will be renamed GOES-West and provide coverage of the American continent and much of the Pacific Ocean.

This short sequence contains the first images captured by the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on board the satellite. It combines imagery from two visible and one infra-red spectral bands to form a ‘GeoColor’ composite. The new generation of GOES is capable of viewing the Earth across 16 spectral bands and provides 4x the spatial resolution and more than 5x faster coverage than its predecessor.

Unfortunately, the ABI on GOES-17 encountered cooling issues after deployment that severely impairs the performance of 13 near-infrared and infrared spectral bands. It’s unclear what caused the issue and whether it can be resolved.

Source: https://youtu.be/7XlfE0ndv_g (NOAA)
Learn More: https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/GOES-R-Series-Satellites

#ScienceGIF #Science #GIF #GOES #GOES17 #NASA #NOAA #Hemisphere #Advanced #Baseline #Imager #ABI View Original Post on Google+

First Imagery from GOES-17

Capturing Plasma in a Syringe

26 May 2018

The Tesla Coil is an electrical circuit invented by Nikola Tesla in 1891 that is used to produce high-voltage, low-current electricity. They are best known for brilliant sparking discharges caused by ionization of the surrounding air by the strong electric field, which allows it to conduct electricity. Ionized gases are also known as plasma , the fourth fundamental state of matter.

Here, a syringe is being used to create a near-vacuum environment that allows the electrons to travel more easily and further than under standard atmospheric conditions. This allows the plasma to persist for much longer than normal.

Source: https://youtu.be/WM25pUsrODk (ElectroBOOM)

#ScienceGIF #Science #GIF #Plasma #Electron #Tesla #Coil #TeslaCoil #Physics #Electricity #Vacuum #Arc #Ionized View Original Post on Google+

Capturing Plasma in a Syringe

Demonstrating Lenz's Law with an MRI machine

19 May 2018

Faraday ‘s Law of Induction describes how a magnetic field interacts with an electric circuit to produce an electromotive force. It is the fundamental principle behind both electric motors and generators. An important aspect of this is Lenz ‘s Law, which states than when an induced current flows, the resulting magnetic field will always oppose the change that produced it.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines produce a strong magnetic field along the central bore where the patient resides. This particular machine has a static magnetic field strength of 3 Tesla, which is approximately 100,000x stronger than that of the Earth’s.

When a piece of aluminum (a non-ferromagnetic metal) is moved through the MRI machine’s magnetic field, it induces an electric current in the metal. Per Lenz’s Law, the magnetic field produced by this induced current opposes the original movement and results in the aluminum slowly falling over.

Source: https://youtu.be/QwUq8xM_8bY

#ScienceGIF #Science #GIF #Magnetism #Electromagnetism #Faraday #Lenz #Law #Physics #MRI #Magnets #Induction #Current #Field #Aluminum #Metal #Force #Electric #Magnetic View Original Post on Google+

Demonstrating Lenz's Law with an MRI machine